DMT W8F 8-Inch Diamond Whetstone Sharpener, Fine with Hardwood Box


Innovative, precision flat two grit diamond sharpener featuring both interrupted and continuous diamond sharpening. A hardwood box of 3- 6 inches Diamond Whetstone sharpeners makes a perfect gift. Dual purpose with compact convenience, the Double Sided Diafold Sharpener offers two 4 inches x 1 inches Diamond Whetstone surfaces in one light-weight, portable sharpener. For professional sharpening results, regardless of skill, depend on DMT Aligner Kits and Accessories. Fast honing diamond surface with the realigning function and convenience of traditional butcher’s steel. DMT’s precisely engineered Dia-Sharp Bench Stone with continuous diamond surface assures consistent, even sharpening every time.
Related Applications: Knifes, scissors, tools AND featuring a continuous zone for small and pointed tools Related Applications: Woodworking, home, culinary, hunting, and more Related Applications: Home, camping, toolbox, pavilion and more Related Applications: Handworked, culinary and outdoor sports. Related Applications: Chef knife, carving knife, fillet knife, paring knife, bread knife, skinning knife Related Applications: Woodworking and culinary.
Models: WM8CX, WM8FC, WM8EF, WM8EF-WB, W8EF-H-WB. Models: W6X, W6XP, W6C, W6CP, W6F, W6FP, W6E, W6EP, W8X, W8XNB, W8C, W8CNB, W8F, W8FNB, W8E, W8ENB and available in durable plastic storage case. Models: FWCX, FWEF, FWEEE. Models: ADELUXE, AKFC, AKFNR. Models: DS4F, DS2E, DSOF. Models: D8XX, D8X, D8C, D8E, D8EE. Size: 6 inches, 8 inches, 10 inches and 11,5 inches.
No oil is needed – sharpen dry or with water. No oil is needed – sharpen dry or with water. No oil is needed – sharpen dry or with water. No oil is needed – sharpen dry or with water. No oil is needed – sharpen dry or with water. No oil is needed – sharpen dry or with water.


Weight: 334 g
Size: 20.3 cm / 8 Zoll
Dimensions: 38.1 x 29.21 x 21.59 cm; 334.52 Grams
Model: W8F
Part: W8F
Colour: Transparent
Pack Quantity: 1
Batteries Required: No
Batteries Included: No
Manufacture: DMT
Colour: Transparent
Quantity: 1
Size: 20.3 cm / 8 Zoll

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29 Responses

  1. MilanPalladino says:

     United States

    Golden Review Award: 2 From Our UsersThe stone I bought, labeled as simply “One Size”, is an 8 inch Whetstone, fine grit (600 grit), color is red because DMT fine grit whetstones are red. Their extra fine ones are green (1200 Grit), coarse grit are blue (325 grit), and extra course (220 grit) are black. Amazon doesn’t sell the latter two. For kitchen knives, all you really need is this stone, the fine (red) stone, as long as you don’t let your knives get too dull.

    You can buy a set of three 6 inch DMT whetstones, different grits, for close to the same price as this single 8 inch whetstone, but I bit the bullet and bought the 8 inch because I like the extra size that much better and all I need is the fine grit stone.

    I tend to let my knives get dull to where they don’t easily start a cut on a tomato, then a few minutes with the Whetstone and the blade will again shave hairs off my arm and easily cut a tomato. The technique I use is to keep the stone wet (a puddle of water on the stone, it should be kept wet while sharpening), and move the blade across the stone as if I was taking slices out of the stone, while holding the blade at as close to a 20 degree angle as I can. Not a ton of pressure while sharpening, but you should feel a little resistance as you move the blade across the stone. Equal sharpening on each side of the blade (except for some Japanese knives).

    When done with the Whetstone rinse it off and dry it. I’ve tried lots of sharpening systems, and this 8 inch fine stone is my favorite.

  2. Anonymous says:

     United States

    Golden Review Award: 2 From Our UsersThe stone I bought, labeled as simply “One Size”, is an 8 inch Whetstone, fine grit (600 grit), color is red because DMT fine grit whetstones are red. Their extra fine ones are green (1200 Grit), coarse grit are blue (325 grit), and extra course (220 grit) are black. Amazon doesn’t sell the latter two. For kitchen knives, all you really need is this stone, the fine (red) stone, as long as you don’t let your knives get too dull.

    You can buy a set of three 6 inch DMT whetstones, different grits, for close to the same price as this single 8 inch whetstone, but I bit the bullet and bought the 8 inch because I like the extra size that much better and all I need is the fine grit stone.

    I tend to let my knives get dull to where they don’t easily start a cut on a tomato, then a few minutes with the Whetstone and the blade will again shave hairs off my arm and easily cut a tomato. The technique I use is to keep the stone wet (a puddle of water on the stone, it should be kept wet while sharpening), and move the blade across the stone as if I was taking slices out of the stone, while holding the blade at as close to a 20 degree angle as I can. Not a ton of pressure while sharpening, but you should feel a little resistance as you move the blade across the stone. Equal sharpening on each side of the blade (except for some Japanese knives).

    When done with the Whetstone rinse it off and dry it. I’ve tried lots of sharpening systems, and this 8 inch fine stone is my favorite.

  3. Anonymous says:

     United States

    Golden Review Award: 2 From Our UsersThe stone I bought, labeled as simply “One Size”, is an 8 inch Whetstone, fine grit (600 grit), color is red because DMT fine grit whetstones are red. Their extra fine ones are green (1200 Grit), coarse grit are blue (325 grit), and extra course (220 grit) are black. Amazon doesn’t sell the latter two. For kitchen knives, all you really need is this stone, the fine (red) stone, as long as you don’t let your knives get too dull.

    You can buy a set of three 6 inch DMT whetstones, different grits, for close to the same price as this single 8 inch whetstone, but I bit the bullet and bought the 8 inch because I like the extra size that much better and all I need is the fine grit stone.

    I tend to let my knives get dull to where they don’t easily start a cut on a tomato, then a few minutes with the Whetstone and the blade will again shave hairs off my arm and easily cut a tomato. The technique I use is to keep the stone wet (a puddle of water on the stone, it should be kept wet while sharpening), and move the blade across the stone as if I was taking slices out of the stone, while holding the blade at as close to a 20 degree angle as I can. Not a ton of pressure while sharpening, but you should feel a little resistance as you move the blade across the stone. Equal sharpening on each side of the blade (except for some Japanese knives).

    When done with the Whetstone rinse it off and dry it. I’ve tried lots of sharpening systems, and this 8 inch fine stone is my favorite.

  4. LawrencE00 says:

     United States

    Golden Review Award: 2 From Our UsersThe stone I bought, labeled as simply “One Size”, is an 8 inch Whetstone, fine grit (600 grit), color is red because DMT fine grit whetstones are red. Their extra fine ones are green (1200 Grit), coarse grit are blue (325 grit), and extra course (220 grit) are black. Amazon doesn’t sell the latter two. For kitchen knives, all you really need is this stone, the fine (red) stone, as long as you don’t let your knives get too dull.

    You can buy a set of three 6 inch DMT whetstones, different grits, for close to the same price as this single 8 inch whetstone, but I bit the bullet and bought the 8 inch because I like the extra size that much better and all I need is the fine grit stone.

    I tend to let my knives get dull to where they don’t easily start a cut on a tomato, then a few minutes with the Whetstone and the blade will again shave hairs off my arm and easily cut a tomato. The technique I use is to keep the stone wet (a puddle of water on the stone, it should be kept wet while sharpening), and move the blade across the stone as if I was taking slices out of the stone, while holding the blade at as close to a 20 degree angle as I can. Not a ton of pressure while sharpening, but you should feel a little resistance as you move the blade across the stone. Equal sharpening on each side of the blade (except for some Japanese knives).

    When done with the Whetstone rinse it off and dry it. I’ve tried lots of sharpening systems, and this 8 inch fine stone is my favorite.

  5. Anonymous says:

     United States

    Golden Review Award: 2 From Our UsersThe stone I bought, labeled as simply “One Size”, is an 8 inch Whetstone, fine grit (600 grit), color is red because DMT fine grit whetstones are red. Their extra fine ones are green (1200 Grit), coarse grit are blue (325 grit), and extra course (220 grit) are black. Amazon doesn’t sell the latter two. For kitchen knives, all you really need is this stone, the fine (red) stone, as long as you don’t let your knives get too dull.

    You can buy a set of three 6 inch DMT whetstones, different grits, for close to the same price as this single 8 inch whetstone, but I bit the bullet and bought the 8 inch because I like the extra size that much better and all I need is the fine grit stone.

    I tend to let my knives get dull to where they don’t easily start a cut on a tomato, then a few minutes with the Whetstone and the blade will again shave hairs off my arm and easily cut a tomato. The technique I use is to keep the stone wet (a puddle of water on the stone, it should be kept wet while sharpening), and move the blade across the stone as if I was taking slices out of the stone, while holding the blade at as close to a 20 degree angle as I can. Not a ton of pressure while sharpening, but you should feel a little resistance as you move the blade across the stone. Equal sharpening on each side of the blade (except for some Japanese knives).

    When done with the Whetstone rinse it off and dry it. I’ve tried lots of sharpening systems, and this 8 inch fine stone is my favorite.

  6. Anonymous says:

     United States

    Golden Review Award: 2 From Our UsersThe stone I bought, labeled as simply “One Size”, is an 8 inch Whetstone, fine grit (600 grit), color is red because DMT fine grit whetstones are red. Their extra fine ones are green (1200 Grit), coarse grit are blue (325 grit), and extra course (220 grit) are black. Amazon doesn’t sell the latter two. For kitchen knives, all you really need is this stone, the fine (red) stone, as long as you don’t let your knives get too dull.

    You can buy a set of three 6 inch DMT whetstones, different grits, for close to the same price as this single 8 inch whetstone, but I bit the bullet and bought the 8 inch because I like the extra size that much better and all I need is the fine grit stone.

    I tend to let my knives get dull to where they don’t easily start a cut on a tomato, then a few minutes with the Whetstone and the blade will again shave hairs off my arm and easily cut a tomato. The technique I use is to keep the stone wet (a puddle of water on the stone, it should be kept wet while sharpening), and move the blade across the stone as if I was taking slices out of the stone, while holding the blade at as close to a 20 degree angle as I can. Not a ton of pressure while sharpening, but you should feel a little resistance as you move the blade across the stone. Equal sharpening on each side of the blade (except for some Japanese knives).

    When done with the Whetstone rinse it off and dry it. I’ve tried lots of sharpening systems, and this 8 inch fine stone is my favorite.

  7. BeatrizAmies says:

     United States

    Golden Review Award: 2 From Our UsersThe stone I bought, labeled as simply “One Size”, is an 8 inch Whetstone, fine grit (600 grit), color is red because DMT fine grit whetstones are red. Their extra fine ones are green (1200 Grit), coarse grit are blue (325 grit), and extra course (220 grit) are black. Amazon doesn’t sell the latter two. For kitchen knives, all you really need is this stone, the fine (red) stone, as long as you don’t let your knives get too dull.

    You can buy a set of three 6 inch DMT whetstones, different grits, for close to the same price as this single 8 inch whetstone, but I bit the bullet and bought the 8 inch because I like the extra size that much better and all I need is the fine grit stone.

    I tend to let my knives get dull to where they don’t easily start a cut on a tomato, then a few minutes with the Whetstone and the blade will again shave hairs off my arm and easily cut a tomato. The technique I use is to keep the stone wet (a puddle of water on the stone, it should be kept wet while sharpening), and move the blade across the stone as if I was taking slices out of the stone, while holding the blade at as close to a 20 degree angle as I can. Not a ton of pressure while sharpening, but you should feel a little resistance as you move the blade across the stone. Equal sharpening on each side of the blade (except for some Japanese knives).

    When done with the Whetstone rinse it off and dry it. I’ve tried lots of sharpening systems, and this 8 inch fine stone is my favorite.

  8. Anonymous says:

     United States

    Golden Review Award: 2 From Our UsersThe stone I bought, labeled as simply “One Size”, is an 8 inch Whetstone, fine grit (600 grit), color is red because DMT fine grit whetstones are red. Their extra fine ones are green (1200 Grit), coarse grit are blue (325 grit), and extra course (220 grit) are black. Amazon doesn’t sell the latter two. For kitchen knives, all you really need is this stone, the fine (red) stone, as long as you don’t let your knives get too dull.

    You can buy a set of three 6 inch DMT whetstones, different grits, for close to the same price as this single 8 inch whetstone, but I bit the bullet and bought the 8 inch because I like the extra size that much better and all I need is the fine grit stone.

    I tend to let my knives get dull to where they don’t easily start a cut on a tomato, then a few minutes with the Whetstone and the blade will again shave hairs off my arm and easily cut a tomato. The technique I use is to keep the stone wet (a puddle of water on the stone, it should be kept wet while sharpening), and move the blade across the stone as if I was taking slices out of the stone, while holding the blade at as close to a 20 degree angle as I can. Not a ton of pressure while sharpening, but you should feel a little resistance as you move the blade across the stone. Equal sharpening on each side of the blade (except for some Japanese knives).

    When done with the Whetstone rinse it off and dry it. I’ve tried lots of sharpening systems, and this 8 inch fine stone is my favorite.

  9. Anonymous says:

     United States

    Golden Review Award: 2 From Our UsersThe stone I bought, labeled as simply “One Size”, is an 8 inch Whetstone, fine grit (600 grit), color is red because DMT fine grit whetstones are red. Their extra fine ones are green (1200 Grit), coarse grit are blue (325 grit), and extra course (220 grit) are black. Amazon doesn’t sell the latter two. For kitchen knives, all you really need is this stone, the fine (red) stone, as long as you don’t let your knives get too dull.

    You can buy a set of three 6 inch DMT whetstones, different grits, for close to the same price as this single 8 inch whetstone, but I bit the bullet and bought the 8 inch because I like the extra size that much better and all I need is the fine grit stone.

    I tend to let my knives get dull to where they don’t easily start a cut on a tomato, then a few minutes with the Whetstone and the blade will again shave hairs off my arm and easily cut a tomato. The technique I use is to keep the stone wet (a puddle of water on the stone, it should be kept wet while sharpening), and move the blade across the stone as if I was taking slices out of the stone, while holding the blade at as close to a 20 degree angle as I can. Not a ton of pressure while sharpening, but you should feel a little resistance as you move the blade across the stone. Equal sharpening on each side of the blade (except for some Japanese knives).

    When done with the Whetstone rinse it off and dry it. I’ve tried lots of sharpening systems, and this 8 inch fine stone is my favorite.

  10. Anonymous says:

     United States

    Golden Review Award: 2 From Our UsersThe stone I bought, labeled as simply “One Size”, is an 8 inch Whetstone, fine grit (600 grit), color is red because DMT fine grit whetstones are red. Their extra fine ones are green (1200 Grit), coarse grit are blue (325 grit), and extra course (220 grit) are black. Amazon doesn’t sell the latter two. For kitchen knives, all you really need is this stone, the fine (red) stone, as long as you don’t let your knives get too dull.

    You can buy a set of three 6 inch DMT whetstones, different grits, for close to the same price as this single 8 inch whetstone, but I bit the bullet and bought the 8 inch because I like the extra size that much better and all I need is the fine grit stone.

    I tend to let my knives get dull to where they don’t easily start a cut on a tomato, then a few minutes with the Whetstone and the blade will again shave hairs off my arm and easily cut a tomato. The technique I use is to keep the stone wet (a puddle of water on the stone, it should be kept wet while sharpening), and move the blade across the stone as if I was taking slices out of the stone, while holding the blade at as close to a 20 degree angle as I can. Not a ton of pressure while sharpening, but you should feel a little resistance as you move the blade across the stone. Equal sharpening on each side of the blade (except for some Japanese knives).

    When done with the Whetstone rinse it off and dry it. I’ve tried lots of sharpening systems, and this 8 inch fine stone is my favorite.

  11. BlythePonytailParades says:

     United Kingdom

    As far as Diamond stones are concerned there are only two top makes in my and many other peoples books, and DML is one of them.
    I normally just use two grades (grits), which are Coarse 325 and Extra Fine 1200.
    This really is a throwback from my childhood, when my dad taught me to sharpen chisels and plane blades on a 2-in-1 oilstone but things have moved on now.
    At school I was taught by a ex cabinet maker of the ‘old school’ who really was a amazing master craftsman and even then he used 3 stones but of course diamond whetstones didn’t exist in those days.
    One of the things he taught us was “ALWAYS buy the best tools and makes that you can” and even in school all the tools were Stanley, we are talking early 60’s here and not the 1860’s by the way !

    Anyway I continued my habit of using just 2 stones until I realised I was spending way to much time and especially effort on the Extra Fine 1200 grit and my shoulders were starting to ache way too much, it was more like a work out than sharpening.
    My solution ?
    Buy a Fine 600 grit diamond whetstone and what a difference it made, but I only bought a cheap one, because it was a ‘test run’ and not surprisingly it didn’t last long at all, so time to buy a ‘proper’ one and this was my choice.
    Once again I was taught on 6″ x 2″ stones, but the 8″ x 3″ stone, although more expensive is MUCH better, especially if, like me, you have some plane blades that are over 2″ wide, it also gives a lot more room to work on, I would never go back to a 6″ x 2″ ever again. the bigger size is just so liberating.

    By introducing this 3rd whetstone it has completely revolutionised my sharpening experience, wish I had done it years and years ago, but you tend to stick what you are comfortable with, which in this case really was a mistake.
    This DMT Whetstone comes in a lovely hardwood box which although not essential is a really, really nice touch and of course the lid protects the stone in case of accidents.
    There is a lot of debate about what to use as a lubricant, and to be honest there is really no wrong lubricant even though some manufacturers say don’t use any lubricant at all but I don’t agree with that as you need to use something to take away the metal particles left from the sharpening process.
    You can use an alcohol based ‘window cleaner’ that you can buy very cheaply and I have tried that, but personally I find the proper lubricant, although once again more expensive is by far the best and you will get a better life from the diamond stone too, and ‘if’ there is any tendency to rust then the proper lubricant is like WD40 and will stop that, just wipe the diamond stone with a cloth after use.

    I haven’t covered technique as there are plenty of videos on YouTube for that but I really can’t stress enough just how good this diamond stone is, it is a delight to use, and please buy this one, especially if you only use 2 stones at present, you will thank me.

    The diamond whetstone has revolutionised sharpening so that you always get the very best result possible so spend a little more money on this excellent make’ it will repay you many times over and you also won’t need to buy so many 1200 grit stones as well, its a win-win situation.

    I was very fortunate that I managed to get this stone from Amazon Warehouse for half price and it was 100% perfect, obviously someone bought it and decided it was too expensive, and returned it, his loss is definitely my gain and thank you very much Amazon for that but don’t get me wrong though, if that hadn’t been available I would have gladly paid the full price.

    Nothing more to say but this gets 5 stars all day long and really should be your ‘go to brand’ for diamond whetstones.

  12. David Matthews says:

     United Kingdom

    As far as Diamond stones are concerned there are only two top makes in my and many other peoples books, and DML is one of them.
    I normally just use two grades (grits), which are Coarse 325 and Extra Fine 1200.
    This really is a throwback from my childhood, when my dad taught me to sharpen chisels and plane blades on a 2-in-1 oilstone but things have moved on now.
    At school I was taught by a ex cabinet maker of the ‘old school’ who really was a amazing master craftsman and even then he used 3 stones but of course diamond whetstones didn’t exist in those days.
    One of the things he taught us was “ALWAYS buy the best tools and makes that you can” and even in school all the tools were Stanley, we are talking early 1960’s here and not the 1860’s by the way !

    Anyway I continued my habit of using just 2 stones until I realised I was spending way to much time and especially effort on the Extra Fine 1200 grit and my shoulders were starting to ache way too much, it was more like a work out than sharpening.
    My solution ?
    Buy a Fine 600 grit diamond whetstone and what a difference it made, but I only bought a cheap one, because it was a ‘test run’ and not surprisingly it didn’t last long at all, so time to buy a ‘proper’ one and this was my choice.
    Once again I was taught on 6″ x 2″ stones, but the 8″ x 3″ stone, although more expensive is MUCH better, especially if, like me, you have some plane blades that are over 2″ wide, it also gives a lot more room to work on, I would never go back to a 6″ x 2″ ever again. the bigger size is just so liberating.

    By introducing this 3rd whetstone it has completely revolutionised my sharpening experience, wish I had done it years and years ago, but you tend to stick what you are comfortable with, which in this case really was a mistake.
    This DMT Whetstone comes in a lovely hardwood box which although not essential is a really, really nice touch and of course the lid protects the stone in case of accidents.
    There is a lot of debate about what to use as a lubricant, and to be honest there is really no wrong lubricant even though some manufacturers say don’t use any lubricant at all but I don’t agree with that as you need to use something to take away the metal particles left from the sharpening process.
    You can use an alcohol based ‘window cleaner’ that you can buy very cheaply and I have tried that, but personally I find the proper lubricant, although once again more expensive is by far the best and you will get a better life from the diamond stone too, and ‘if’ there is any tendency to rust then the proper lubricant is like WD40 and will stop that, just wipe the diamond stone with a cloth after use.

    I haven’t covered technique as there are plenty of videos on YouTube for that but I really can’t stress enough just how good this diamond stone is, it is a delight to use, and please buy this one, especially if you only use 2 stones at present, you will thank me.

    The diamond whetstone has revolutionised sharpening so that you always get the very best result possible so spend a little more money on this excellent make’ it will repay you many times over and you also won’t need to buy so many 1200 grit stones as well, its a win-win situation.

    Nothing more to say but this gets 5 stars all day long and really should be your ‘go to brand’ for diamond whetstones.

  13. Gemma Cartwright says:

     United Kingdom

    As far as Diamond stones are concerned there are only two top makes in my and many other peoples books, and DML is one of them.
    I normally just use two grades (grits), which are Coarse 325 and Extra Fine 1200.
    This really is a throwback from my childhood, when my dad taught me to sharpen chisels and plane blades on a 2-in-1 oilstone but things have moved on now.
    At school I was taught by a ex cabinet maker of the ‘old school’ who really was a amazing master craftsman and even then he used 3 stones but of course diamond whetstones didn’t exist in those days.
    One of the things he taught us was “ALWAYS buy the best tools and makes that you can” and even in school all the tools were Stanley, we are talking early 1960’s here and not the 1860’s by the way !

    Anyway I continued my habit of using just 2 stones until I realised I was spending way to much time and especially effort on the Extra Fine 1200 grit and my shoulders were starting to ache way too much, it was more like a work out than sharpening.
    My solution ?
    Buy a Fine 600 grit diamond whetstone and what a difference it made, but I only bought a cheap one, because it was a ‘test run’ and not surprisingly it didn’t last long at all, so time to buy a ‘proper’ one and this was my choice.
    Once again I was taught on 6″ x 2″ stones, but the 8″ x 3″ stone, although more expensive is MUCH better, especially if, like me, you have some plane blades that are over 2″ wide, it also gives a lot more room to work on, I would never go back to a 6″ x 2″ ever again. the bigger size is just so liberating.

    By introducing this 3rd whetstone it has completely revolutionised my sharpening experience, wish I had done it years and years ago, but you tend to stick what you are comfortable with, which in this case really was a mistake.
    This DMT Whetstone comes in a lovely hardwood box which although not essential is a really, really nice touch and of course the lid protects the stone in case of accidents.
    There is a lot of debate about what to use as a lubricant, and to be honest there is really no wrong lubricant even though some manufacturers say don’t use any lubricant at all but I don’t agree with that as you need to use something to take away the metal particles left from the sharpening process.
    You can use an alcohol based ‘window cleaner’ that you can buy very cheaply and I have tried that, but personally I find the proper lubricant, although once again more expensive is by far the best and you will get a better life from the diamond stone too, and ‘if’ there is any tendency to rust then the proper lubricant is like WD40 and will stop that, just wipe the diamond stone with a cloth after use.

    I haven’t covered technique as there are plenty of videos on YouTube for that but I really can’t stress enough just how good this diamond stone is, it is a delight to use, and please buy this one, especially if you only use 2 stones at present, you will thank me.

    The diamond whetstone has revolutionised sharpening so that you always get the very best result possible so spend a little more money on this excellent make’ it will repay you many times over and you also won’t need to buy so many 1200 grit stones as well, its a win-win situation.

    Nothing more to say but this gets 5 stars all day long and really should be your ‘go to brand’ for diamond whetstones.

  14. Anonymous says:

     United Kingdom

    As far as Diamond stones are concerned there are only two top makes in my and many other peoples books, and DML is one of them.
    I normally just use two grades (grits), which are Coarse 325 and Extra Fine 1200.
    This really is a throwback from my childhood, when my dad taught me to sharpen chisels and plane blades on a 2-in-1 oilstone but things have moved on now.
    At school I was taught by a ex cabinet maker of the ‘old school’ who really was a amazing master craftsman and even then he used 3 stones but of course diamond whetstones didn’t exist in those days.
    One of the things he taught us was “ALWAYS buy the best tools and makes that you can” and even in school all the tools were Stanley, we are talking early 1960’s here and not the 1860’s by the way !

    Anyway I continued my habit of using just 2 stones until I realised I was spending way to much time and especially effort on the Extra Fine 1200 grit and my shoulders were starting to ache way too much, it was more like a work out than sharpening.
    My solution ?
    Buy a Fine 600 grit diamond whetstone and what a difference it made, but I only bought a cheap one, because it was a ‘test run’ and not surprisingly it didn’t last long at all, so time to buy a ‘proper’ one and this was my choice.
    Once again I was taught on 6″ x 2″ stones, but the 8″ x 3″ stone, although more expensive is MUCH better, especially if, like me, you have some plane blades that are over 2″ wide, it also gives a lot more room to work on, I would never go back to a 6″ x 2″ ever again. the bigger size is just so liberating.

    By introducing this 3rd whetstone it has completely revolutionised my sharpening experience, wish I had done it years and years ago, but you tend to stick what you are comfortable with, which in this case really was a mistake.
    This DMT Whetstone comes in a lovely hardwood box which although not essential is a really, really nice touch and of course the lid protects the stone in case of accidents.
    There is a lot of debate about what to use as a lubricant, and to be honest there is really no wrong lubricant even though some manufacturers say don’t use any lubricant at all but I don’t agree with that as you need to use something to take away the metal particles left from the sharpening process.
    You can use an alcohol based ‘window cleaner’ that you can buy very cheaply and I have tried that, but personally I find the proper lubricant, although once again more expensive is by far the best and you will get a better life from the diamond stone too, and ‘if’ there is any tendency to rust then the proper lubricant is like WD40 and will stop that, just wipe the diamond stone with a cloth after use.

    I haven’t covered technique as there are plenty of videos on YouTube for that but I really can’t stress enough just how good this diamond stone is, it is a delight to use, and please buy this one, especially if you only use 2 stones at present, you will thank me.

    The diamond whetstone has revolutionised sharpening so that you always get the very best result possible so spend a little more money on this excellent make’ it will repay you many times over and you also won’t need to buy so many 1200 grit stones as well, its a win-win situation.

    Nothing more to say but this gets 5 stars all day long and really should be your ‘go to brand’ for diamond whetstones.

  15. thebranddetective says:

     United Kingdom

    As far as Diamond stones are concerned there are only two top makes in my and many other peoples books, and DML is one of them.
    I normally just use two grades (grits), which are Coarse 325 and Extra Fine 1200.
    This really is a throwback from my childhood, when my dad taught me to sharpen chisels and plane blades on a 2-in-1 oilstone but things have moved on now.
    At school I was taught by a ex cabinet maker of the ‘old school’ who really was a amazing master craftsman and even then he used 3 stones but of course diamond whetstones didn’t exist in those days.
    One of the things he taught us was “ALWAYS buy the best tools and makes that you can” and even in school all the tools were Stanley, we are talking early 1960’s here and not the 1860’s by the way !

    Anyway I continued my habit of using just 2 stones until I realised I was spending way to much time and especially effort on the Extra Fine 1200 grit and my shoulders were starting to ache way too much, it was more like a work out than sharpening.
    My solution ?
    Buy a Fine 600 grit diamond whetstone and what a difference it made, but I only bought a cheap one, because it was a ‘test run’ and not surprisingly it didn’t last long at all, so time to buy a ‘proper’ one and this was my choice.
    Once again I was taught on 6″ x 2″ stones, but the 8″ x 3″ stone, although more expensive is MUCH better, especially if, like me, you have some plane blades that are over 2″ wide, it also gives a lot more room to work on, I would never go back to a 6″ x 2″ ever again. the bigger size is just so liberating.

    By introducing this 3rd whetstone it has completely revolutionised my sharpening experience, wish I had done it years and years ago, but you tend to stick what you are comfortable with, which in this case really was a mistake.
    This DMT Whetstone comes in a lovely hardwood box which although not essential is a really, really nice touch and of course the lid protects the stone in case of accidents.
    There is a lot of debate about what to use as a lubricant, and to be honest there is really no wrong lubricant even though some manufacturers say don’t use any lubricant at all but I don’t agree with that as you need to use something to take away the metal particles left from the sharpening process.
    You can use an alcohol based ‘window cleaner’ that you can buy very cheaply and I have tried that, but personally I find the proper lubricant, although once again more expensive is by far the best and you will get a better life from the diamond stone too, and ‘if’ there is any tendency to rust then the proper lubricant is like WD40 and will stop that, just wipe the diamond stone with a cloth after use.

    I haven’t covered technique as there are plenty of videos on YouTube for that but I really can’t stress enough just how good this diamond stone is, it is a delight to use, and please buy this one, especially if you only use 2 stones at present, you will thank me.

    The diamond whetstone has revolutionised sharpening so that you always get the very best result possible so spend a little more money on this excellent make’ it will repay you many times over and you also won’t need to buy so many 1200 grit stones as well, its a win-win situation.

    Nothing more to say but this gets 5 stars all day long and really should be your ‘go to brand’ for diamond whetstones.

  16. maleenhancementx46 says:

     United Kingdom

    As far as Diamond stones are concerned there are only two top makes in my and many other peoples books, and DML is one of them.
    I normally just use two grades (grits), which are Coarse 325 and Extra Fine 1200.
    This really is a throwback from my childhood, when my dad taught me to sharpen chisels and plane blades on a 2-in-1 oilstone but things have moved on now.
    At school I was taught by a ex cabinet maker of the ‘old school’ who really was a amazing master craftsman and even then he used 3 stones but of course diamond whetstones didn’t exist in those days.
    One of the things he taught us was “ALWAYS buy the best tools and makes that you can” and even in school all the tools were Stanley, we are talking early 1960’s here and not the 1860’s by the way !

    Anyway I continued my habit of using just 2 stones until I realised I was spending way to much time and especially effort on the Extra Fine 1200 grit and my shoulders were starting to ache way too much, it was more like a work out than sharpening.
    My solution ?
    Buy a Fine 600 grit diamond whetstone and what a difference it made, but I only bought a cheap one, because it was a ‘test run’ and not surprisingly it didn’t last long at all, so time to buy a ‘proper’ one and this was my choice.
    Once again I was taught on 6″ x 2″ stones, but the 8″ x 3″ stone, although more expensive is MUCH better, especially if, like me, you have some plane blades that are over 2″ wide, it also gives a lot more room to work on, I would never go back to a 6″ x 2″ ever again. the bigger size is just so liberating.

    By introducing this 3rd whetstone it has completely revolutionised my sharpening experience, wish I had done it years and years ago, but you tend to stick what you are comfortable with, which in this case really was a mistake.
    This DMT Whetstone comes in a lovely hardwood box which although not essential is a really, really nice touch and of course the lid protects the stone in case of accidents.
    There is a lot of debate about what to use as a lubricant, and to be honest there is really no wrong lubricant even though some manufacturers say don’t use any lubricant at all but I don’t agree with that as you need to use something to take away the metal particles left from the sharpening process.
    You can use an alcohol based ‘window cleaner’ that you can buy very cheaply and I have tried that, but personally I find the proper lubricant, although once again more expensive is by far the best and you will get a better life from the diamond stone too, and ‘if’ there is any tendency to rust then the proper lubricant is like WD40 and will stop that, just wipe the diamond stone with a cloth after use.

    I haven’t covered technique as there are plenty of videos on YouTube for that but I really can’t stress enough just how good this diamond stone is, it is a delight to use, and please buy this one, especially if you only use 2 stones at present, you will thank me.

    The diamond whetstone has revolutionised sharpening so that you always get the very best result possible so spend a little more money on this excellent make’ it will repay you many times over and you also won’t need to buy so many 1200 grit stones as well, its a win-win situation.

    Nothing more to say but this gets 5 stars all day long and really should be your ‘go to brand’ for diamond whetstones.

  17. Winfred63S says:

     United Kingdom

    As far as Diamond stones are concerned there are only two top makes in my and many other peoples books, and DML is one of them.
    I normally just use two grades (grits), which are Coarse 325 and Extra Fine 1200.
    This really is a throwback from my childhood, when my dad taught me to sharpen chisels and plane blades on a 2-in-1 oilstone but things have moved on now.
    At school I was taught by a ex cabinet maker of the ‘old school’ who really was a amazing master craftsman and even then he used 3 stones but of course diamond whetstones didn’t exist in those days.
    One of the things he taught us was “ALWAYS buy the best tools and makes that you can” and even in school all the tools were Stanley, we are talking early 1960’s here and not the 1860’s by the way !

    Anyway I continued my habit of using just 2 stones until I realised I was spending way to much time and especially effort on the Extra Fine 1200 grit and my shoulders were starting to ache way too much, it was more like a work out than sharpening.
    My solution ?
    Buy a Fine 600 grit diamond whetstone and what a difference it made, but I only bought a cheap one, because it was a ‘test run’ and not surprisingly it didn’t last long at all, so time to buy a ‘proper’ one and this was my choice.
    Once again I was taught on 6″ x 2″ stones, but the 8″ x 3″ stone, although more expensive is MUCH better, especially if, like me, you have some plane blades that are over 2″ wide, it also gives a lot more room to work on, I would never go back to a 6″ x 2″ ever again. the bigger size is just so liberating.

    By introducing this 3rd whetstone it has completely revolutionised my sharpening experience, wish I had done it years and years ago, but you tend to stick what you are comfortable with, which in this case really was a mistake.
    This DMT Whetstone comes in a lovely hardwood box which although not essential is a really, really nice touch and of course the lid protects the stone in case of accidents.
    There is a lot of debate about what to use as a lubricant, and to be honest there is really no wrong lubricant even though some manufacturers say don’t use any lubricant at all but I don’t agree with that as you need to use something to take away the metal particles left from the sharpening process.
    You can use an alcohol based ‘window cleaner’ that you can buy very cheaply and I have tried that, but personally I find the proper lubricant, although once again more expensive is by far the best and you will get a better life from the diamond stone too, and ‘if’ there is any tendency to rust then the proper lubricant is like WD40 and will stop that, just wipe the diamond stone with a cloth after use.

    I haven’t covered technique as there are plenty of videos on YouTube for that but I really can’t stress enough just how good this diamond stone is, it is a delight to use, and please buy this one, especially if you only use 2 stones at present, you will thank me.

    The diamond whetstone has revolutionised sharpening so that you always get the very best result possible so spend a little more money on this excellent make’ it will repay you many times over and you also won’t need to buy so many 1200 grit stones as well, its a win-win situation.

    Nothing more to say but this gets 5 stars all day long and really should be your ‘go to brand’ for diamond whetstones.

  18. Anonymous says:

     United Kingdom

    As far as Diamond stones are concerned there are only two top makes in my and many other peoples books, and DML is one of them.
    I normally just use two grades (grits), which are Coarse 325 and Extra Fine 1200.
    This really is a throwback from my childhood, when my dad taught me to sharpen chisels and plane blades on a 2-in-1 oilstone but things have moved on now.
    At school I was taught by a ex cabinet maker of the ‘old school’ who really was a amazing master craftsman and even then he used 3 stones but of course diamond whetstones didn’t exist in those days.
    One of the things he taught us was “ALWAYS buy the best tools and makes that you can” and even in school all the tools were Stanley, we are talking early 1960’s here and not the 1860’s by the way !

    Anyway I continued my habit of using just 2 stones until I realised I was spending way to much time and especially effort on the Extra Fine 1200 grit and my shoulders were starting to ache way too much, it was more like a work out than sharpening.
    My solution ?
    Buy a Fine 600 grit diamond whetstone and what a difference it made, but I only bought a cheap one, because it was a ‘test run’ and not surprisingly it didn’t last long at all, so time to buy a ‘proper’ one and this was my choice.
    Once again I was taught on 6″ x 2″ stones, but the 8″ x 3″ stone, although more expensive is MUCH better, especially if, like me, you have some plane blades that are over 2″ wide, it also gives a lot more room to work on, I would never go back to a 6″ x 2″ ever again. the bigger size is just so liberating.

    By introducing this 3rd whetstone it has completely revolutionised my sharpening experience, wish I had done it years and years ago, but you tend to stick what you are comfortable with, which in this case really was a mistake.
    This DMT Whetstone comes in a lovely hardwood box which although not essential is a really, really nice touch and of course the lid protects the stone in case of accidents.
    There is a lot of debate about what to use as a lubricant, and to be honest there is really no wrong lubricant even though some manufacturers say don’t use any lubricant at all but I don’t agree with that as you need to use something to take away the metal particles left from the sharpening process.
    You can use an alcohol based ‘window cleaner’ that you can buy very cheaply and I have tried that, but personally I find the proper lubricant, although once again more expensive is by far the best and you will get a better life from the diamond stone too, and ‘if’ there is any tendency to rust then the proper lubricant is like WD40 and will stop that, just wipe the diamond stone with a cloth after use.

    I haven’t covered technique as there are plenty of videos on YouTube for that but I really can’t stress enough just how good this diamond stone is, it is a delight to use, and please buy this one, especially if you only use 2 stones at present, you will thank me.

    The diamond whetstone has revolutionised sharpening so that you always get the very best result possible so spend a little more money on this excellent make’ it will repay you many times over and you also won’t need to buy so many 1200 grit stones as well, its a win-win situation.

    Nothing more to say but this gets 5 stars all day long and really should be your ‘go to brand’ for diamond whetstones.

  19. Kate Reilly says:

     United Kingdom

    As far as Diamond stones are concerned there are only two top makes in my and many other peoples books, and DML is one of them.
    I normally just use two grades (grits), which are Coarse 325 and Extra Fine 1200.
    This really is a throwback from my childhood, when my dad taught me to sharpen chisels and plane blades on a 2-in-1 oilstone but things have moved on now.
    At school I was taught by a ex cabinet maker of the ‘old school’ who really was a amazing master craftsman and even then he used 3 stones but of course diamond whetstones didn’t exist in those days.
    One of the things he taught us was “ALWAYS buy the best tools and makes that you can” and even in school all the tools were Stanley, we are talking early 1960’s here and not the 1860’s by the way !

    Anyway I continued my habit of using just 2 stones until I realised I was spending way to much time and especially effort on the Extra Fine 1200 grit and my shoulders were starting to ache way too much, it was more like a work out than sharpening.
    My solution ?
    Buy a Fine 600 grit diamond whetstone and what a difference it made, but I only bought a cheap one, because it was a ‘test run’ and not surprisingly it didn’t last long at all, so time to buy a ‘proper’ one and this was my choice.
    Once again I was taught on 6″ x 2″ stones, but the 8″ x 3″ stone, although more expensive is MUCH better, especially if, like me, you have some plane blades that are over 2″ wide, it also gives a lot more room to work on, I would never go back to a 6″ x 2″ ever again. the bigger size is just so liberating.

    By introducing this 3rd whetstone it has completely revolutionised my sharpening experience, wish I had done it years and years ago, but you tend to stick what you are comfortable with, which in this case really was a mistake.
    This DMT Whetstone comes in a lovely hardwood box which although not essential is a really, really nice touch and of course the lid protects the stone in case of accidents.
    There is a lot of debate about what to use as a lubricant, and to be honest there is really no wrong lubricant even though some manufacturers say don’t use any lubricant at all but I don’t agree with that as you need to use something to take away the metal particles left from the sharpening process.
    You can use an alcohol based ‘window cleaner’ that you can buy very cheaply and I have tried that, but personally I find the proper lubricant, although once again more expensive is by far the best and you will get a better life from the diamond stone too, and ‘if’ there is any tendency to rust then the proper lubricant is like WD40 and will stop that, just wipe the diamond stone with a cloth after use.

    I haven’t covered technique as there are plenty of videos on YouTube for that but I really can’t stress enough just how good this diamond stone is, it is a delight to use, and please buy this one, especially if you only use 2 stones at present, you will thank me.

    The diamond whetstone has revolutionised sharpening so that you always get the very best result possible so spend a little more money on this excellent make’ it will repay you many times over and you also won’t need to buy so many 1200 grit stones as well, its a win-win situation.

    Nothing more to say but this gets 5 stars all day long and really should be your ‘go to brand’ for diamond whetstones.

  20. Anonymous says:

     United Kingdom

    As far as Diamond stones are concerned there are only two top makes in my and many other peoples books, and DML is one of them.
    I normally just use two grades (grits), which are Coarse 325 and Extra Fine 1200.
    This really is a throwback from my childhood, when my dad taught me to sharpen chisels and plane blades on a 2-in-1 oilstone but things have moved on now.
    At school I was taught by a ex cabinet maker of the ‘old school’ who really was a amazing master craftsman and even then he used 3 stones but of course diamond whetstones didn’t exist in those days.
    One of the things he taught us was “ALWAYS buy the best tools and makes that you can” and even in school all the tools were Stanley, we are talking early 1960’s here and not the 1860’s by the way !

    Anyway I continued my habit of using just 2 stones until I realised I was spending way to much time and especially effort on the Extra Fine 1200 grit and my shoulders were starting to ache way too much, it was more like a work out than sharpening.
    My solution ?
    Buy a Fine 600 grit diamond whetstone and what a difference it made, but I only bought a cheap one, because it was a ‘test run’ and not surprisingly it didn’t last long at all, so time to buy a ‘proper’ one and this was my choice.
    Once again I was taught on 6″ x 2″ stones, but the 8″ x 3″ stone, although more expensive is MUCH better, especially if, like me, you have some plane blades that are over 2″ wide, it also gives a lot more room to work on, I would never go back to a 6″ x 2″ ever again. the bigger size is just so liberating.

    By introducing this 3rd whetstone it has completely revolutionised my sharpening experience, wish I had done it years and years ago, but you tend to stick what you are comfortable with, which in this case really was a mistake.
    This DMT Whetstone comes in a lovely hardwood box which although not essential is a really, really nice touch and of course the lid protects the stone in case of accidents.
    There is a lot of debate about what to use as a lubricant, and to be honest there is really no wrong lubricant even though some manufacturers say don’t use any lubricant at all but I don’t agree with that as you need to use something to take away the metal particles left from the sharpening process.
    You can use an alcohol based ‘window cleaner’ that you can buy very cheaply and I have tried that, but personally I find the proper lubricant, although once again more expensive is by far the best and you will get a better life from the diamond stone too, and ‘if’ there is any tendency to rust then the proper lubricant is like WD40 and will stop that, just wipe the diamond stone with a cloth after use.

    I haven’t covered technique as there are plenty of videos on YouTube for that but I really can’t stress enough just how good this diamond stone is, it is a delight to use, and please buy this one, especially if you only use 2 stones at present, you will thank me.

    The diamond whetstone has revolutionised sharpening so that you always get the very best result possible so spend a little more money on this excellent make’ it will repay you many times over and you also won’t need to buy so many 1200 grit stones as well, its a win-win situation.

    Nothing more to say but this gets 5 stars all day long and really should be your ‘go to brand’ for diamond whetstones.

  21. Maggie says:

     United States

    Love DMT sharpeners! This one replaces my 6″ block & fits in nicely with my 8″ fine grit whetstone DMT sharpener! This one works an edge well & then can be honed with the fine grit.

  22. Anonymous says:

     United States

    Love DMT sharpeners! This one replaces my 6″ block & fits in nicely with my 8″ fine grit whetstone DMT sharpener! This one works an edge well & then can be honed with the fine grit.

  23. YolandaCadle says:

     United States

    Love DMT sharpeners! This one replaces my 6″ block & fits in nicely with my 8″ fine grit whetstone DMT sharpener! This one works an edge well & then can be honed with the fine grit.

  24. LavondaMendelso says:

     United States

    Love DMT sharpeners! This one replaces my 6″ block & fits in nicely with my 8″ fine grit whetstone DMT sharpener! This one works an edge well & then can be honed with the fine grit.

  25. Jackie Lam says:

     United States

    Love DMT sharpeners! This one replaces my 6″ block & fits in nicely with my 8″ fine grit whetstone DMT sharpener! This one works an edge well & then can be honed with the fine grit.

  26. Anonymous says:

     United States

    Love DMT sharpeners! This one replaces my 6″ block & fits in nicely with my 8″ fine grit whetstone DMT sharpener! This one works an edge well & then can be honed with the fine grit.

  27. Outlaw Vern says:

     United States

    Love DMT sharpeners! This one replaces my 6″ block & fits in nicely with my 8″ fine grit whetstone DMT sharpener! This one works an edge well & then can be honed with the fine grit.

  28. Anonymous says:

     United States

    Love DMT sharpeners! This one replaces my 6″ block & fits in nicely with my 8″ fine grit whetstone DMT sharpener! This one works an edge well & then can be honed with the fine grit.

  29. Anonymous says:

     United States

    Love DMT sharpeners! This one replaces my 6″ block & fits in nicely with my 8″ fine grit whetstone DMT sharpener! This one works an edge well & then can be honed with the fine grit.

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